* war and social upheaval: World War II -- aftermath Germany and Japan








The Aftermath of World War II: The Axis Powers


Figure 1.-- The landscape of German cities were devestated by the War. Here a German school boys heads to school amid the remains of a once great city. The photograph was taken by Otto Hagel some time about 1946 or 47. I'm not sure about the city, perhaps Cologne.

There were three Axis countries defeated in World War II: Germany, Italy, and Japan. The United States, Britain and France in West Germany and the United States in Japan oversaw an occupation with changed the nature of German and Japanese society, rooting out NAZIism and militarism and fomenting the development of democratic political regimes and social structures. The results by all practical measures have been an overwhelming success. Germany and Japan today are two of the most prosperous and democratic societies in the world. There were, however, major differences in the Allied occupation policies pursued in the two countries. Germany unlike Japan was also occupied by the Soviet Union. The Soviet occupation policies in eastern Germany were very different than those pursued in the western occupation zone. The Soviets also occupied the Eastern European countries that joined the Axis in the War, in some cases under duress: Bulgaria, Hungary, and Romania. Spain dispatched a division to the Eastern Front, but never declared war on France, England, and America. The other World War II totalitarian aggressor nation, the Soviet Union, wanted to join the Axis, but Hitler refused and instead attacked the Soviets. They thus played a major part of the defeat of the Axis and became an occupyingh power, not only in Japan, but most of Eastern Europe. The Soviets were not defeated and not occupied by the western Allies and as a result did not develop a modern, vibrant democratic society and prosperous economy.

Axis Countries

The three principal Axis countries were Germany, Italy, and Japan. These three countries and the Soviet Union, were the countries primarily responsible for launching World War II. Each was treated very differently by the Allies. Germany was divided and subjected to a thorough process od De-Nazification including De-Nazification courts. The Italians were largely allowed to deal with the Fascist on their own. While Japan was forced to accept unconditional surrender like Germany, in fact the Japanese were allowed to keep the Emperor and the the Government was not dismanteled like the NAZI Government. The United states also refused to permit the Soviet Union to participate in the occupation. There were war crimes and the United States imposed wide-spread reforms. Several Eastern European countries also joined the Axis with various degrees of compulsion by the NAZIs. Some like Slovakia were puppet states. Other like Romania and Bularia were forced into the Axis, both by the Soviets and Germans. Hungary was more of a willing participant. Each of these countries was occupied by the Soviet Union which proceeded to install Soviet-style regimes. There were also areas from neighboring countries that the NAZIs annexed to the Reich.

War Crimes Trials

The primary warcrime trials were the International Military Tribunals in Germany and Japan. There were no international tribunals in Italy. There were also national trials in the occupied countries that focused more on local collaborators. The International War Crimes Trials introduced a new concept in international law, making the planning, preparing, initiating, or waging of war of aggression a crime. After World War II, the International Military Tribunal at Nurnberg (composed of a judge from Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States) tried NAZI leaders. The International Military Tribunal for the Far East, at Tokyo (composed of a judge from Australia, Britain, Canada, (Nationalist) China, France, India, the Netherlands, New Zealand, the Philippines, the Soviet Union, and the United States) tried Japanese leaders. Both tribunals stressed in their proceedings that laubching a war of aggression "is not only an international crime; it is the supreme international crime". The two tribunals established the principle that only high government officials actually formulating or influencing governmental policy can be charged with "crimes against peace. Thus soldiers in an army who have a legal obligation to follow the orders of their government can not be procecuted for crimes against peace while the political leaders and ranking generals could. Low ranking individual could, however, be procecuted for individual acts of atroicities such as the murder of civilians. All of the occupied countries tried local collaborators. The Soviets controlled the trials in Eastern Europe. The trials in Western Europe wee conducted like the International Tribunals as real trials with judicial safeguards. Trials in Asia were more varied.

Soviet Union

The other World War II totalitarian aggressor nation, the Soviet Union, wanted to join the Axis, but Hitler refused and instead attacked the Soviets. They thus played a major part of the defeat of the Axis and became an occupyingh power, not only in Japan, but most of Eastern Europe. The Soviets were not defeated and not occupied by the western Allies and as a result did not develop a modern, vibrant democratic society and prosperous economy.

Reader Comment

A HBC reader writes, "I must start off by saying you have wonderful site. Even though I have not gone through most of your site, it still marvels me on how clothing can help depict history. Anyway I must ask you if you can direct me to any resource that talk about in detail the occupation of Japan and maybe Europe if you can? For you see I am planning to a write a fictional story about the occupation of Japan and another about the war in Europe. But the problem is I want to get everything that is factual right. Like the units that were there, how the people reacted, and so forth. Even though you did help answer that question about occupation for me it be nice if you direct me to more source to help me get a better picture. For me, if i told something that was not true about the time or misrepresent something I feel I be doing a great disservice for the people of that time and to everyone." HBC would appreciate any suggestions reader may have about good accounts of the occupation of Germany and Japan.

Sources

Haffner, Sebastian. Defying Hitler (Farrar Straus Giroux).






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Created: November 7, 2002
Spell check: February 29, 2004
Last updated: 2:08 PM 6/27/2019