The Holocaust in Germany: Killing Proponents


Figure 1.--Countless images from the NAZI era show considerable support for the regime, including fervent support. This should not be seen as support for the Holocaust. Perhaps support for anti-Semitic policies, but not for mass killing. There were many other aspects of NAZI rule that drew popular support such as ending unemployment, restoring national pride, repealing the Versailles Treaty, reduceing street violence, regaining loss territory, uniting Germans, and other matters Notice herehow even the little children can make the salute correctly.

There is no doubt that anti-Semitism was widespread in Germany. And there was indeed very substanial support for Hitler and the regime, even widespread support. A very large substantial portion of the popularion had anti-Semitic views, but this varied widely. And this does not mean there was wide-spread support for killing Jews. There was anti-Semitism of greatly varied intensity. of varying intensity. The intensity may have been stronger in Germany. So called 'scientific' anti-Semitism was more pronounced in Germany than in any other country. That said, the number of Germans who wanted to muder the country's Jews or Jews in other countries was a small minority. And probably a minority even within the NAZI Party. The numbers who wanted to reduce the influence of Jews or even expel Jews from Germany was much larger. But the numbers who wanted to actually murder European Jewery was relatively small. This of course very difficult to estimate with any percession. We are not sure even how to attempt to measure this. Even membership in the NAZI Party, which is known, did not mean that there was a desire to kill Jews, although there would have been a larger propotion than the population in general. Membership was relatively small until the NAZIs seized power, but peaked at 8 million in 1945. And Party membership expanded greatly after the NAZIs seized por as people saw the possibility for advancement. Membership in the SA, another known number is probably a better indicator, but also not a precise measure of people who fully supported mass murder. Membership in the SA my be a better, but again not precise indicator. SA membership peaked at about 2 million in 1934. There is now way to know the number of propents of mass murder with any cetainty. We notice one estimate of perhaps some 0.4 million. A substantial number, but a very small portion of the overall German population. [McMillan] There are authors who postulate a much larger group who actually supported killing. [Glass]

Sources

Glass, James M. "Against the infiference hypothesis: The Holocaust and the enhusiasts for murder," Political Psychology Vol. 9, No. 1 (March 1997), pp. 129-45.

McMillan, Dan. How Could This Happen: Explaining the Holocaust.






CIH







Navigate the CIH Holocaust Pages:
[Return to the Main German Holocaust Knowledge and Complicity page]
[Return to the Main German Holocaust page]
[Return to the Main Holocaust page]
[Allies] [Biographies] [Children] [Concentration camps] [Countries] [Decision] [Denyers/Apologists] [Displaced persons] [Economics] [Eisatzgruppen] {German Jews] [Ghettoes] [Impact] [Justice] [Literature]
[Movies] [NAZIs] [Occupied Poland] [Process] [Propagada] [Resistance] [Restitution] [Questions] [SA] [SS] [Special situations] [Targets] [Wansee Conference] [World War II]
[Main mass killing pagel




Created: 9:23 AM 6/29/2014
Last updated: 9:23 AM 6/29/2014