Theatrical Productions: English Radio Trends


Figure 1.--The "Just William" stories were broadcast on BBC radio during the 1940's. Child actor John Clark who was the voice of William on radio, until his voice broke that is. Notice his "snake" belt. Perhaps because he played William on the radio, he does not have either his trade-mark cirtcle cap worn askew, his horizonatal striped tie, or his kneesocks wornnat his ankles. He is riding, however, his Hercules cycle.

Britain had the highest level of radio ownership in Europe, but it was no where close to American radio ownership. Some of the most momentous radio broadcasts of the 20th century would come over those sets. First the timorus Chamberklain than the booming voice of a primeminister Churchill preparing to answer NAZI agression with them force of a free people fully aware of what they faced. "What kind of people do they think we are?" he asked the British people. HBC has very little information about English radio. One of the most famous radio, or wireless as it was called in England, broadcasts of all time took place during the 1930s in England, the abdication of Edward VIII. We know that the British also had commercial entertainment programing similar to American programing. We have noted, for example, of favorites like Just William on British radio. The stories were also broadcast on BBC radio in the 1940s. Child actor John Clark who was the voice of William on radio, until his voice broke that is.

Radio Ownership

Britain had the highest level of radio ownership in Europe, but it was no where close to American radio ownership. Some of the most momentous radio broadcasts of the 20th century would come over those sets. First the timorus Chamberklain than the booming voice of a primeminister Churchill preparing to answer NAZI agression with thefirce of a free people fully aware of what they faced. "What kind of people do they think we are?" he asked the British people.

News Broadcasting

One of the most famous radio, or wireless as it was called in England, broadcasts of all time took place during the 1930s in England, the abdication of Edward VIII. King George VI delivered an annual Christmas messag to the British people. Most crossed their fingers hoping that he would be able to overcome the speech impediment that troubled him. Some of the most momentous radio broadcasts of the 20th century would come over those sets. Only a few years later they heard over the radio from a timerous Primeminister Chamberlain that they were at war with Germany. Than came the booming voice of a primeminister Churchill preparing to answer NAZI agression with them force of a free people fully aware of what they faced. When Hitler demanded the British acede to a v\Vichy-like settlement, Churchill asked the British peopke, "What kind of people do they think we are?" The BBC allowed American correspondents broadcast from London during the World War II Blitz. Most Americans at the time recall Ed R. Murrow's "London calling ...." And for the people of Europe, the BBC was a beacon of hope during the long NAZI occupation.

Entertaiment

We know that the British also had commercial entertainment programing similar to American programing. We have noted, for example, favorites like Just William on British radio. The stories were also broadcast on BBC radio during the 1940s. Child actor John Clark who was the voice of William on radio, until his voice broke that is. Jihn had previously played the star pupil on the "Will Hay Programme". A HBC reader reports that he remembers many BBC programs during the 1940s and 50s, especially drama plays. In particular he remembers "The War of the Worlds" and "Moby Dick" for the 'Third Programme'. A British reader writes, "I recall in the early-1950s thatthere was was a lot of comedy on the radio perticulary on a Sunday afternoon. Drama was and still is broadcast. Every Sunday on Radio 4 is a play lasting about an hour. Saturday night at 8:30 was also a time for a BBC Radio drama. There is still a weekly soap called the Archers started in the 1940s and still running. The radio is still heavily used by schools and produces School's Radio even though there is School TV programmes and internet based BBC programs"

Special Programming

We notice a variety of interesting special programs. One example was a program focusing on loval communities. For example, a small village got to tell the world about itself by radio. Lamport, a village in Northamptonshire is not even marked on most maps. The village in October 1933 was opened to radio listeners all over the world. It waschosen by the BBC to open a new series of broadcasts illustrating the life of interesting villages. It was broadcast ot the Empire as well as being picked up by America. The first Lamportian to face the microphone was Chrissie Smith, a little girl of 11. She described what Lamport looks like. She will be followed by William Dickens, the oldest inhabitant.







HBC






Navigate the Boys' Historical Clothing Web Site:
[See also the Main country trend radio page]
[Introduction] [Activities] [Biographies] [Chronology] [Clothing styles] [Countries] [Theatricals]
[Bibliographies] [Contributions] [FAQs] [Glossaries] [Images] [Links] [Registration] [Tools]
[Boys' Clothing Home]




Created: June 18, 2002
Last updated: 5:00 AM 2/10/2013