* Australian boys clothes: photography








Australian Boys' Clothes: Photography


Figure 1.--This 14-year old Australian boy was photographed in 1895 elegantly attired in a knicker suit showing some sailor styling. Note the backdrop and primitive outdoor setting. The image is from the Australian National Library (an2499331-v).

The British colonization of Australia began at about the same time that photography was developed (1839). Acrually the British arrived earlier, but only about the mid-19th century were substantial numbers of Europeans in Australia. Thus the country has an almost complete photographic record of its history, with the exception of course of the aboriginal population. HBC has no images from the mid-19th century, but has noted some interesting images from itinerate profesional photographers. Before the development of the Kodak Brownie in 1900, amateur photographs were nor common. Such itinerate professional photographers operated in other countries as well, serving rural populations which could not easily get to photographic studios in towns. HBC finds some of these photogtaphs interesting. Some are taken in rough surroundings. Similar portraits in America usually had the house, however primative, as the background. Not only are the backgrounds distinctive, but the boys are often emacualetly attired in the latest fashions--in sharp contrast to the rough surroundings. Boys in similar American portraits were rarely photographed individually. For many such rural families, a family portrait was a major expense and they could not afford individual portraits of each family member. The Australian boys despite their rough surroundings look like they come from prosperous families. The American families photographed by itinerate photograhers, while they dressed up for the portraits, rarely wore the elegant attire shown in some of the Australian portraits. One HBC reader reports that one of these itinerate photographers was someone quite well known in Australia. HBC does not. however, yet know his name. The Australian National Library has a wonderful collection of these portraits.

Chronology

Australia's aboriginal population dates back essenrially to the dawn of humanity, And they bhave left dascinating art wirk depictibg aninals and people. Captain Janes Cook landed at Botony Bay beginning the modern hutory of Australia (1770). It would, however, be some time before sugbificant nimbers of Europeans settlers would arrive in Australia. The British colonization of Australia began in earnest at about the same time that photography was developed (1839). Thus the country has an almost complete photographic record of its history akthough there are vert few survibibg 1849s portrairss. . The first photograph taken in Australia was a daguerreotype image of Bridge Street, Sydney. It was tajen by aval captain, Captain Augustin Lucas (1841). Australia’s first professional photographer was George Goodman. He opened daguerreotype studio on George Street in Sydney (1842). The earliest known surviving Austrakian photograph is a a daguerreotype portrait of Dr William Bland by Goodman (1845) Thorton Richards Camera House in Ballarat (1872) is the oldest known camera store. RMIT University in Melbourne began teachinhg photography (1887). The Universirt claims that this is the oldest ongoing photography course in the world. HBC has no images from the mid-19th century, but has found some CDVs from about 1870. These are all stidio images, but we alkso note some interesting images from itinerate profesional photographers.

Photographic Types

A number of European expeimters were wirking on photographt in the earlu-19th century. A ranbge of importabnt achiuevements were noted in Britain and France. The first important commercial photographic process was developed in France -- the Daguerreotype (1839). It was followed by the Ambtotype (mid-1850s). The largest photographic industry developed in America. We do not yet have, however, any of the early photographu types from Australia. Only with the development and great popularity of the CDV so we begin to have any substantial numbr of Australian imnages (1860s). Soon after the CDV, the larger cabinet card appears. Both used the albumen process, the first imprtant process creating negatives allowung copies to be made. Alnimen phiigraphy dominated Europe and Amnerica as well as Australia (1960s-90s). Before the development of the Kodak Brownie in 1900, amateur photographs were not common. Such itinerate professional photographers operated in other countries as well, serving rural populations which could not easily get to photographic studios in towns. The American Kodal Brownie and similar systems curtuall created the family snapshot. Ut brought the family sbapshot with the price ramge of the ordinnary family, further expanding pohotograpgy and meaning that every day family life could be photographed. Photography was nor as widespread in Australia ascin America--essentially an economic matter. Color photography was developed in Europe and America(1930s), bit did not become wifdespread intil the post-World War II period.

Studio Photography

HBC finds some of these photogtaphs interesting. Some are taken in rough surroundings. Similar portraits in America usually had the house, however primative, as the background. Not only are the backgrounds distinctive, but the boys are often emacualetly attired in the latest fashions--in sharp contrast to the rough surroundings. Boys in similar American portraits were rarely photographed individually. For many such rural families, a family portrait was a major expense and they could not afford individual portraits of each family member. The Australian boys despite their rough surroundings look like they come from prosperous families. The American families photographed by itinerate photograhers, while they dressed up for the portraits, rarely wore the elegant attire shown in some of the Australian portraits. One HBC reader reports that one of these itinerate photographers was someone quite well known in Australia. HBC does not. however, yet know his

Aiustralian National Library

The Australian National Library has a wonderful collection of these portraits.









HBC






Navigate the Boys' Historical Clothing Web Site:
[Introduction] [Activities] [Bibliographies] [Biographies] [Chronology] [Clothing styles]
[Contributions] [FAQs] [Glossaries] [Satellite sites]
[Boys' Clothing Home]



Navigate the Boys' Historical Clothing Australian pages
[Australian choirs] [Autralian movies] [Australian orphanage clothing] [Australian school uniform] [Australian television] [Australian youth groups]



Navigate the Boys' Historical Clothing Web Site:
[Return to the Main Australian country page]
[Return to the Main photography page]
[Return to the Main country page]
[Canada] [England] [France] [Germany] [Ireland] [Italy] [New Zealand] [Scotland] [United States]




Crerated: February 6, 2002
Last updated: 7:38 PM 7/21/2020